Janiva Ellis, Catchphrase Coping Mechanism, 2019, oil on linen, 2.2 x 1.8 m. Courtesy: the artist and 47 Canal, New York; photograph: Joerg Lohse

frieze magazine

Issue 203

May 2019

frieze editor Andrew Durbin delves into cover artist Janiva Ellis’s ruptured figurative paintings; Sarah Manguso contemplates the work of Vija Celmins and the art of reckoning with silence; Ben Mauk unpacks the work of Natascha Süder Happelmann and the problem of representation in large-scale exhibitions; queer cyberfeminist Shu Lea Cheang speaks to artist Zach Blas about surveillance, control and the pleasures of the panopticon; and Tony Cokes recodes Kodwo Eshun’s memorial lecture for Mark Fisher for the issue’s visual essay.

Plus, 29 reviews from around the world, including reports from four non-profit spaces in London and Gretchen Bender’s first posthumous retrospective at Red Bull Arts New York.

Cover image: Janiva Ellis, Catchphrase Coping Mechanism, 2019, oil on linen, 2.2 x 1.8 m. Courtesy: the artist and 47 Canal, New York; photograph: Joerg Lohse

Renato Leotta employs moonlight, waves, dry-stone walls and ‘southern thought’ in order to ‘slow down time’

By Barbara Casavecchia

The queer cyberfeminist pioneer’s Taiwan Pavilion in Venice explores surveillance, pleasure and control

By Zach Blas
Natascha Süder Happelmann (right) and her spokeswoman Helene Duldung (left), in front of the Federal Foreign Office, Berlin, 2018. Photograph: Jasper Kettner

Can Natascha Süder Happelmann succeed in doing away with national ‘representation’ altogether?

By Ben Mauk
Zacharias Kunuk, Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner, 2001. Courtesy: Viviane Delisle and Isuma Distribution International, Montreal

Ahead of representing Canada at the 58th Venice Biennale, the director discusses his 30-year career making films about Inuit life

By Zacharias Kunuk
St. Mark's Square During the Historic Flood, 1966. Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons

To address the ‘interesting times’ alluded to in the title of the 58th Venice Biennale, we must challenge the language we use to describe them

By Andrew Durbin

An exhibition at Seventeen, London, reflects upon the precarious world that the arts professional must negotiate

By Paul Rekret

A retrospective of the late Iranian-American director at Berlin’s KW Institute for Contemporary Art shows society in ruin

By Stanton Taylor

Artists Barby Asante, Libita Clayton and Ashley Holmes are reimagining what it means to go back home

By Kadish Morris

This specially-commissioned visual essay by Tony Cokes draws from theorist Kodwo Eshun’s moving epitaph for his friend, the critic Mark Fisher

By Tony Cokes

From Mx Justin Vivian Bond to Andy Warhol: fan artists in New York

By Olivia Laing

An exhibition at Matthew Marks Gallery, New York, examines Johns’s recent paintings and how the artist’s intentions remain steadfastly encrypted

By Jack McGrath

From viral slime to medieval botany, these artists are probing the margins of mainstream knowledge 

By Mimi Chu